Reviews

[review1]

[review1]

 

The Ruckus -  "Ghosts"  April 2010

Ghosts was the first Mark Geary album I heard, and in many ways, there is no better introduction to the Irish singer-songwriter. That certainly isn’t to say that his other albums have less merit, because they don’t – but Ghosts perfectly encapsulates so much of his personality, his live shows, and his total body of work. And while several tracks feature cameos from such legendary singers as Glen Hansard and Josh Ritter, every single song is uniquely, unmistakably Geary’s.

The album is a dynamic piece that shifts from songs of boisterous joy, to more dark and heavy tracks, to quiet and gentle moments. The first few tracks are light, and happy, propelling you forward with steady beats, lovely harmonies, and strumming that will make you want to tap your foot, no matter where you are or what you’re doing. But just as soon as you’re comfortable in that light and pleasant state, he plunges you down into the murky depths of the song “Morphine”. “You look like you’ve lost something,” he sings, and you’re not sure if he’s singing to you or for you or about you, but no matter which way you interpret it, the lyric rings true.

“Fanfare” and “A Prayer for St. Rita” lift you right back up again, but by the last few tracks, you’re left with a very different feeling than the one you had at the sound of the first chord. “Up & Up” is a delicate tune that was meant to heard on a rainy autumn morning. Geary sounds as though he’s right next to you, softly singing, “be my valentine for a whole year,” and you want to say yes. The final song, “Hold Tight”, is one of the absolute best album-closing songs I’ve ever heard. It’s a grey sort of lullaby, as though Geary is singing you to sleep after the longest day in your life. And just when you think the song is over, you stumble upon the piece of dusty treasure that is “I’m Tired”. Whether you want to call it a bonus track or a second part of the final track, it’s an incredibly compelling song. Geary’s voice is so sincere that it almost hurts.

After the final notes have faded off into the ether, you feel as though you’ve been through some significant experience – something that puts a few more lines in your face, but a bit more twinkle in your eyes as well.

 

[review3]

[review3]

 

[review4]

[review4]

 

[review5]

[review5]

 

[review6]

[review6]

 

[review7]

[review7]

 

[review8]

[review8]